The 1920’s saw the rise of John T. Woodside as one of the wealthiest men in the state of South Carolina. His success in cotton mills, banking, investments, and the hospitality industry within Greenville meant he was financially secure enough to…

As Woodside brothers John T., J. David, Robert I., and Edward F. gained affluence due to the success of their cotton mill venture they set out on a new enterprise: banking. Robert attended Clemson College for several semesters before withdrawing and…

In 1902 local entrepreneur John T. Woodside opened Woodside Mill and enlisted the help of three of his brothers J. David, Robert I., and Edward F. With John T. heading the operation as president of the company the mill saw immediate success. Within…

Hippies of the late 1960s and early 1970s exhibited a fascination with Eastern religions and spirituality. They began practicing yoga and meditation, and these practices eventually spread to other more “mainstream” parts of society. Transcendental…

There are several iterations of the Issaqueena legend, though they all generally follow the same format. Issaqueena, whose name likely comes from the Choctaw word "isi-okhina" which means "deer creek," was a young Native American woman living in what…

Harrisburg Plantation was built by John Harris Jr. in the late 1700s after Harris bought the land using funds he had acquired as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Harris soon became a notable figure in the upstate serving as a judge, doctor, and…

Rock-and-Roll was the international language of youth rebellion during the 1960s and 1970s. It united the youth of the counterculture like politics could not. Clemson’s Littlejohn Coliseum hosted a number of rock-and-roll bands, including the Allman…

“Hair” was a musical written by Gerome Ragni and James Rado with music by Galt MacDermot which premiered off Broadway in 1967, and the next year performed on Broadway. The musical has been called the first rock-musical on Broadway, and was surrounded…

Christ Church came to be largely as a result of Vardry McBee, known as the “Father of Greenville,” a businessman who created downtown Greenville when he built a number of mills and business in the city. McBee gave land for the creation of the first…

Though there had been a Jewish population within Greenville dating back to 1790s, they did not congregate together for worship in great numbers until 1910. This was the result of the rise of working-class Jewish immigrants to the Greenville area, and…